Penelope's Dream

Lalikova

Year:

2017

Media:

paper yarn on linen, copper

Size (cm):

150 x 50 x 3

Roma 2018

Please rate this

Other works

Penelope's Dream

Lalikova

Year:

2017

Media:

paper yarn on linen, copper

Size (cm):

100 x 100 x 3

Roma 2018

Penelope's Dream

Lalikova

Year:

2017

Media:

paper yarn on linen, copper

Size (cm):

100 x 100 x 3

Roma 2018

Biography

Slovakian born and London based, Zuzana is a designer and craftswoman working with fiber and textiles. Her work is heavily influenced by tradition and traditional crafts, predominately from her home country of Slovakia. Coming from a rich cultural background she found and early interest in embroidery that she then developed further through a degree study at London College of Fashion. Interested in value of human labour in our mechanized world, craft remains at the core of her practice. Embroidery is a main focus of her work; re-purposing traditional craft techniques into contemporary designs, with geometry being an endless source of inspiration. Working in a intuitive way she creates embroidery artworks of varying scales from her studio in SW London, blurring lines between art and craft.

Project

Penelope’s dream is crossing disciplines from fiber art to installation to performance. The artwork was created one day at a time for the duration of one week during London Design Festival.
A self supporting embroidery frame 7 meters long made of copper pipes was built and set up in the middle of the gallery on which the artist stretched a piece fabric in a same way a traditional embroidery frame would be set up. The fabric was then worked on for one week, one meter at a time.
Working in an intuitive way drawing inspiration from the environment, surrounding artworks and interactions with visitors the aim of the artist was to create poetic and evocative work free of socio-political agenda.
Improvised collage of paper fibers and simple expressive gestures will immerse the viewer in a tactile world of textile.
Once finished, the artwork was displayed suspended from the ceiling allowing the light to pass through and be examined from both sides.
At a later date, the tapestry was split into 7 panels and the copper structure was dismantled to create frame upon which the artworks were stretched individually.