Burnt Norton

Ingram

Year:

2016

Media:

Oil on Linen

Size (cm):

66 x 46 x 3

Roma 2018

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Ingram

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Media:

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Ingram

Year:

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Media:

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Size (cm):

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Biography

Born 1989 in Perth, Australia

I am an Australian currently based in a small town near the Peak District in the UK.

At the age of 17 I attained a scholarship to study classical drawing and painting techniques at the Angel Academy of Art in Florence, Italy. I completed my studies in 2009 and moved to London where I established a studio and produced work for exhibitions in Australia and the UK. During my time in London I immersed myself in the vibrant contemporary art scene which helped me to refine my approach to painting both technically and thematically.

In 2013 I moved to a small town near the Peak District with my partner, two cats and a three dogs. In our spare time we run a dog rescue called SilverPaws and foster other dogs and cats in need. This change in scenery and lifestyle allowed me to further develop the themes of nature and natural history within my work.

Project

Artrooms Roma has inspired me to revisit and expand upon a concept which I developed last year: paintings of floating porcelain jars that hover within neutral spaces. The philosophical ideas behind the jar are taken from 'Burnt Norton', a poem by TS Eliot:

‘Words move, music moves
Only in time; but that which is only living
Can only die. Words, after speech, reach
Into the silence. Only by the form, the pattern
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness.’

These lines evoke for me a feeling of timelessness, but also the ability to freeze and capture moments in time. There is a sense of the fragility of beautiful objects and moments.

The original piece was quite a simplistic response to these lines, so I would love the opportunity to develop it further via an installation. This would enable me to play around with different pieces of porcelain, angles and perspectives, and a mixture of broken and complete objects. I feel that a full installation would be more successful in capturing the thematic concepts than the original single painting, as to walk around an entire space that's created for the paintings will leave a much greater impression on the spectators.

For my installation, I will create and place between 3-5 trompe l'œil paintings around the room, each piece lit with a directional light that emphasises the effect of the illusion. I will also display the jars and fragments around the space and leave the rest of the room in a state of constructed chaos. This will create the sense that there has been an argument or fight in the room, perhaps between a couple, and that we are left to trawl through the aftermath of crumpled bedsheets, broken objects and lights at odd angles. The lighting will also create a filmic impression, making the scene feel like a movie set. Soft, looping instrumental music will enhance this effect.