I capelli di Venezia

De Luca

Year:

2017

Media:

Photography

Size (cm):

137 x 193 x 20

Roma 2018

Other works

I capelli di Venezia II

De Luca

Year:

2017

Media:

Photography

Size (cm):

38,5 x 49 x 5

Roma 2018

I capelli di Venezia III

De Luca

Year:

2017

Media:

Photography

Size (cm):

30 x 40 x 4

Roma 2018

Biography

Gianmaria De Luca (1988) is an artist working mostly with photography and
printmaking. He works to share through theimagination, realising images born of col-
laborations and interactions with artists andmuses, and his environment.

Compelled by the mystery of reality and its relationship to the photographic process he primarily employs techniques that occur only at the moment of shooting such as light painting and multiple exposure. Untouched by digital manipulation the results are none the less impossible, mystical worlds.

Born in Rome, Italy, he blends the influence of his native culture with the insight he pursues in other cultures and experiences through travel, creating the original and contemporary imagery in his work.

His work to date includes fine art and reportage photography, experimental installations and work with notable artists and masters of costume and set design, journalism, and filmmaking. He has exhibited globally throughout Italy, Northern Ireland, Germany, Switzerland and Australia.

Project

While living in Venice in 2016, I spent much of my time exploring the city late at night and in the early morning. This is the
best time to see the city as its streets are empty and its beauty and romance are amplified by the silence and the shades of
light and darkness. During the day I found this same magic in its waters.
On the edge of the Venetian canals, there are mist-ravaged lands, turbulent storms and eerie forests lurking. At the same time
I discovered a curious story of nature and humankind which reveals itself in the lagoon waters every summer.
Following the tides and the sun, I began to photograph what I saw in an attempt to capture these worlds. The movement of
the water created a different image with each shot, while the reflections and ripples on its surface allowed me to experiment
with textures that reminded me of incisions and paint strokes.
The marine plant, Sargassum muticum, is an invasive species to the Venetian lagoon and arrived from Asia in recent decades
as a result of human activity. It is now known to locals as ‘I capelli di Venezia’ (the hair of Venice), and is affecting the lagoon’s
biodiversity while creating a hinderance to the city’s gondolas and ferries. It is simultaneously alluring and fascinating as it
moves, appearing and disappearing, and sinking and rising in the water.
In a series of black and white images, ‘I capelli di Venezia’ in contrast with the water reveals an enchanting wilderness that
thrives in the midst of human endeavour both as a consequence of it and a menace to it. The photographs thus aim to cast
a light on the eternal struggles between nature and civilization and bring to the fore the beauty of the natural world in our
everyday surroundings that is often taken for granted.