Ceci n'est pas moi

Alipieva

Year:

2015-2016

Media:

Cross-stitch, beech wood and methacrylate / Installation of 8 pieces

Size (cm):

35-45 x 27,5 x 12

Roma 2018
1/1 (1)

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Other works

Untitled

Alipieva

Year:

2016

Media:

Screen printing on polyester fabric / Installation of 8 pieces

Size (cm):

125-140 x 105 x very thin fabric

Roma 2018

Paper offering for the joy

Alipieva

Year:

2017

Media:

Screen printing on Japanese paper

Size (cm):

27-75 x 27-65 x very thin paper

Roma 2018

Biography

Between 2007 and 2012 I was studying Sculpture and Graphic Arts at the Faculty of Fine Arts in the University of Barcelona. Afterwards I did a Master’s degree of Artistic Production and Research at the same university. During 4 years I had a research grand in the Graphic Arts Section in this Faculty. In 2016 I worked there as a professor in screen printing and engraving.
During the last years I have been part of exhibitions and art fairs in different European cities - Barcelona, Madrid, Valencia, Bilbao, Betanzos, Bologna, London and Magdeburg.

Project

My work is developed from the multiple, mainly from the variations and the alterations. I am interested in the processes in mass production to manipulate them and get multitude of multiple unique. As a starting point I take the errors of the medium in which I am working. Through the repetition and the accumulation the objects and the images become decontextualized, they lose their individual value and are placed in different and unusual contexts.

Mostly I work with portraits/self-portraits and personal objects that remark cultural traditions. I usually use these elements for evidence the subjectivity of the representations. The decision to incorporate the portrait - and later the self-portrait - as part of my work, arose from the continuous "image attack" we experience on a daily basis, mainly through social networks. We only need a phone with camera to show the whole world how we live, who our friends and pets are, where we go on vacations and the most important, what we look like. Nowadays, it has become a habit. More than ever, we are allowed to track the evolution of our acquaintances' private lives and even people whose existence we have just discovered. We are allowed to follow the social media users' day-to-day and for the most of them, their physical appearance. The portrait and the self-portrait, called selfie, has become a tool that allows us to describe with an image, our looks in specific moments of our lives. Does our portrait reflect reality? Can we describe our identity with an image? These are some of the questions which led me to start some of my works. The pieces are a reference to manipulated reality, to the fake that we consume every day and to the filters that we apply to our personality.

Now I am working on a project related to the Chinese funerary tradition of burning representations of objects when someone dies. Those paper offerings for the dead stand for the superstition of being left with nothing in the beyond. For this reason the deceased's relatives and friends make a selection of objects to accompany him/her on the trip. The project “Paper offerings for the joy” takes as a starting point this tradition and then redirects it to a ritual for the joy of the living. It is about collecting objects that have caused pleasant sensations, which have been stimulus when it comes to overcoming negative experiences. In my case the pieces of underwear represent my personal way of looking for joy and value the positive experiences that life offers me. The project tries to provoke the public and encourage them, through the material, to find the reasons for well-being.

For this occasion, the objective is to inhabit a neutral space, such as the hotel room, and establish a dialogue between reality and representation. Invite the public to contemplate and, at the same time, to be part of the installation. I think that it would be a great opportunity to be present as an artist, surrounded by my own work, during the exhibition. In this way the relationship between artist, work and spectator would be narrowed. It would become an intimate space and my works would make more sense because my artistic production starts from the intimate elements and objects that surround me.